Iconic Australian-based franchise network, Banjo’s Bakery Café has worked out the winning formula when it comes to working with likeminded people and engaging franchisees who are committed to business longevity.

Here are two Banjo’s Bakery Café’s franchisees to showcase their contrasting experiences as longstanding and new franchisees.

Taimoor Ashraf, New Franchisee, Banjo’s Bakery Café Darra

Taimoor new franchisee

When did you decide to pursue a career in franchise business ownership?

I grew up in Pakistan and managed our family-owned home textile business for 12 years before moving to Australia. I was always interested in the hospitality industry, studying hotel and business management through my tertiary education. This led me to pursue a franchising opportunity with the Banjo’s team in 2019 for one of their new stores in Queensland.

What drew you to Banjo’s as a business network to be a part of?

I was immediately drawn to the team members at Banjo’s who were passionate, motivated and focused – that’s everyone from the sales team to the franchisees. The network has a solid framework, supported by decades
of experience, which encourages their team’s growth and development.

Why is franchise business fulfilling?

The great thing about owning a franchise business is that there are systems in place to ensure you’re supported, and that each individual venture is profitable. It gives aspiring business owners the possibility of being an owner and manager without the need to go out there and do it alone – its a tried-and-true method. Banjo’s is also leading the industry when it comes to technology, marketing and the way they are innovating their business.

Everyday looks a little different – it’s part of the excitement of the job and the beauty of working in hospitality. A typical day would include baking pastry and bread, making coffee, serving and interacting with customers,
but also the business management that happens in the background. It’s a very diverse role, which is why I love it so much.

What is different about Banjo’s compared to your competitors?

There are many unique things about Banjo’s and their approach to business including their supportive business strategy and growth plan, investment back into the franchises, the family and community ethos behind the
brand, and genuine passion among everyone in the team. While we take baking seriously and always prioritise quality, its important to have a bit of fun too, which is reflected in our limited offer signature pies, such as the
Lasagne Pie, that excite our team as much as the customer.

As the industry develops and becomes more tech-savvy – what are you looking forward to most about the next five years as an owner?

I’m looking forward to the development of technology such as online, app and mobile ordering, but also the progression of tech from a back of house perspective. This is helping us to speed up the purchase process, enhance customer experience, and delivers flawless, convenient, and enjoyable service by adding value to our customers. As a business, technology helps us connect with our customers outside of the store to keep them well informed, along with the useful data and analytics we are able to capture through these orders and reports.

Todd Ferguson, Longstanding Multi-Franchisee, Banjo’s Bakery Café Moonah, Claremont, Salamanca and Park Ridge.

Todd banjos

When did you decide to pursue a career in franchise business ownership?

I started working at Banjo’s straight out of school at 15-years-old going on to complete a baking apprenticeship. After making my way through management at various Banjo’s stores throughout southern Tasmania, I started
a position at Banjo’s Head Office where I oversaw the set-up of new stores and training of new franchisees. The opportunity later came about to buy into a store in my local area and given that Banjo’s had already trained me with the tools to become a franchisee, it seemed like a natural progression.

What drew you to Banjo’s as a business network to be a part of?

My career journey at Banjo’s began at a young age and was the only choice for me when compared with other franchise systems in the market at the time. My natural progression within the company and thorough understanding of the inner workings paved a clear pathway to where I am now – 32 years later.

Why is franchise business fulfilling?

Banjos Drivethru

One of the reasons I decided to start my own business was to provide a better life for my young family at the time. Being by own boss allowed more time with the kids as they grew into the young adults they are now. Franchise business, particularly within Banjo’s, is a fantastic way to do business as you always have the backing of an expert team. There are also advanced support mechanisms and systems in place to ensure ease of management. Life is always on the move as I now have a share in four different locations which means my day
is typically spent overseeing and mentoring staff in one location before moving to another shop in a different suburb or even state. It’s a rewarding undertaking and definitely keeps life interesting!

What is different about Banjo’s compared to your competitors?

Banjo’s is set apart from competitors due to our diverse offerings reaching a wide variety of market segments comparatively to traditional bakery models which may only sell bread and coffee. Our modern store model enables us to deliver increased value to customers, giving them a one stop shop at their disposal. With
our family and community centric ethos at the core, Banjo’s is a people fist service enterprise committed to creating meaningful experiences.

As the industry develops and becomes more tech-savvy – what are you looking forward to most about the next five years as an owner?

We like to embrace technology at Banjo’s and some of the new machinery, particularly relating to the barista technology is really exciting. With our ordering app, online purchasing and refined internal systems, I think anything is possible in the future.

How has your franchise adapted to the COVID landscape?

COVID has been a massive part of doing business over the last two years. As a franchise, we have implemented numerous systems to comply with the ever-changing rules and regulations. The number one priority has been communicating these changes as quickly as possible to the staff and customers to keep the business trading and ensure quality service and the health and safety of our valued customers.

What would you say to those thinking about becoming a franchise owner?

I can highly recommend to anyone thinking of buying into a Banjo’s Franchise, please go ahead as you’re guaranteed to get more out of it than you can possibly imagine.

To learn more about becoming a Banjo’s Franchisee, email franchising@banjos.com.au or visit: banjos.com.au/franchising/opportunities/